Tag Archives: NatureScot

A blizzard of butterflies – “an incredible day” counting northern brown argus

The northern brown argus, at this time of year, is in its twilight months as a hungry caterpillar. The larvae will begin to pupate in May and emerge as butterflies to brighten up small patches of the Scottish countryside through … Continue reading

Posted in citizen science, coastal, Insects, Moths and butterflies, survey, Uncategorized, Volunteering | Tagged , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Bearing Down on Ursid Toponyms

Wild bears have long gone from Scotland’s landscape but echoes of them remain in our place-names … Read in Gaelic It’s far from clear when European brown bears became extinct in Scotland, but it wasn’t yesterday, and it is therefore … Continue reading

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Mac-talla a’ Mhathain air Tìr

ʼS fhada on a dh’fhalbh na mathain fhiadhaich mu dheireadh, ach tha na creutairean seo a’ nochdadh – an siud ʼs an seo – nar n-ainmean-àite fhathast … Read in English Chan eil e soilleir cuin a bhàsaich am mathan … Continue reading

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Land at the heart of nature-based-solutions

Transforming how we use land is an  essential  part  of our  response  to  the  climate  emergency. Great  progress  could  be  made  rapidly  in  agriculture,  forestry  and  other  land  uses  by  using  existing  technologies. But we will need to go further … Continue reading

Posted in Agri-Environment Climate Scheme, biodiversity, climate change, Farming, Land management, Uncategorized | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Frozen lochs – what lies beneath?

In recent weeks as we experienced wintery conditions, many people will have noticed their local ponds and lochs froze over for a period. In today’s blog our freshwater advisory officer Ewan Lawrie takes a closer look at what’s happening below … Continue reading

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Soilleireachadh ‘dubhair’ air mapaichean / Shedding light on toponymic ‘darkness’

Airson ainmean-àite le ‘dubh’ a thuigsinn, ʼs dòcha gum feumar coimhead air slighe na grèine / To interpret place-names with the descriptor ‘dubh’ you may need to look at the path of the sun … Soilleireachadh ‘dubhair’ air mapaichean Is … Continue reading

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YCW2020 A Day in the Life – Freshwater and Wetlands Advice Manager Iain Sime

During the Year of Coasts and Waters 2020, we’ve been featuring NatureScot staff working along our shorelines and waterways to gain an insight into the varied work they do. In our final blog of the series, we join Freshwater and … Continue reading

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Cairt-làir – lus beag le cliù mòr / Tormentil – little plant with a big reputation

Ged a tha e beag, tha dualchas iongantach aig a’ chairt-làir, gu h-àraidh am measg nan Gàidheal / Tormentil might be small and little celebrated today, but it played a substantial role in the social history of northern Scotland … … Continue reading

Posted in Flowers, Folklore, Gaelic, Uncategorized | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Scotland’s Giant Mozzies

We’ve had several reports recently from people who have been attacked by ‘giant mosquitos’, asking whether this is ‘normal’ in Scotland. The short answer is yes, it is normal, there are several native species of mosquito in Scotland. Some species … Continue reading

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#YCW2020 A Day in the Life – Peatland ACTION Project Officer Matthew Cook

During the Year of Coasts and Waters 2020, we’ve been featuring NatureScot staff and partners working along our shorelines and waterways to gain an insight into the varied work they do. This month we hear from Matthew Cook, from the Crichton … Continue reading

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